Millennial Question: Why Does Gen X Love Email?

June 23, 2015 By Lindsey Pollak,

“You’ve got mail!” Ah, the days when the ding of a new message was exciting rather than annoying. With all the apps and productivity tools designed to help us manage our email and all the effort many devote to achieving “Inbox Zero,” it’s hard for millennials — and many others — to believe that Gen Xers used to adore email. And our dirty little secret is that many of us still do.

Of course, not every Gen Xer feels this way, but millennials working for Gen X bosses like me might be perplexed: Why does email persist, with all the other productivity and communication tools like Slack and Basecamp available these days?

3 Reasons Gen Xers Love Email

That’s a totally reasonable question, so let me explain the three reasons we Gen Xers just can’t break up with email.

  • It was our new thing — like Snapchat or texting today. Gen Xers were just starting our work lives when email launched. I remember in my first job at a nonprofit, I had to unplug my landline phone to plug in my router to check my email — yes, on dial up.  Think about it: Email was so important that we would take our entire phone system offline to use it! (Or maybe that was just me. And my boss didn’t exactly know I did that…)
  • It offers cover.  Much of today’s communication is designed to be transitional in nature. But Gen Xers love that email gives us a record so we can say, “See! I did ask you to do this!” Back in the day, really old school bosses would, in fact, print out their emails. Most Gen Xers are too tech savvy for that, but our archives are probably hogging up a chunk of the cloud. We can’t help it; the permanent nature of email makes us feel safe.
  • It makes us feel accomplished. We were the generation of self-sufficiency — latchkey kids, who would come home, pop a Hot Pocket in the microwave and flip on the Atari for a few hours until mom or dad got home. Sure we’ve evolved and can text with the best, but something about sitting down at our desks and sending a bunch of emails makes us feel productive.

4 Tips for Writing Effective Emails

If you find yourself with a boss or client (Gen X or otherwise) who’s into email, it’s crucial to master this still-popular professional communication form. Consider these tips for writing effective emails.

  • Prioritize professionalism. It might seem like a casual medium to you, but in reality every email you send is a brick in the building of your professional reputation. Whatever you write is contributing to your “permanent record” — what your boss thinks of you, what his or her boss thinks of you, and what your clients and other professional contacts think of you. It absolutely can have bearing on your future prospects.
  • Make it safe for any eyes. Remember any email might be forwarded or the recipient might include someone else on the CC chain. Even if you’re only sending an email to your boss, he or she might forward it up the ranks. And we all know the potential danger of “reply all” by now, don’t we?
  • Follow the leader. While emojis are certainly swimming into the mainstream, you still don’t want to be the first to bust out a thumbs up. Always err on the side of professionalism and follow your correspondent’s lead. Or, to be safe, avoid emoji and emoticons entirely in professional communications.
  • Meaningful subject lines matter. Your Gen X boss will be eternally grateful if you remember that one topic = one email. Don’t try to stuff too much information into one email or change topics mid-message. Keeping topics separated and adding a descriptive subject line to each email makes it easier to keep information straight.

The bottom line is always to communicate with someone the way that person wants to be communicated with – whether that’s by phone, in person, via text or over email. Even if another person’s preferred method is not yours, following his or her lead ensures you will get your point across effectively and make a good impression in the process.

Gen Xers: Do you still love your email? Let everyone know why in the comments!

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